Blog

HCK2 INTERNally: The Lingering PR Effect of Lockouts

by HCK2 Interns
Jul
08
2011

Editor's Note: This is a second musing in a series from our @MelanieCornell. Please don't send hate mail. We can't control the sports fandom of her family. Just her... mwah-ha-ha-ha.

Growing up with three brothers and a sister, I was always surrounded by sports. My family usually spent weekends at someone’s game or practice. And when we were home, the Yankees  (my dad is from New York), the Rangers, the Cowboys or the Mavericks were on TV. Add to that, my younger brother is living in Wisconsin and now I can’t get away from the Brewers.

(No, Megan and Susan I am not [and never will be] a fan of the Packers.)

This year has been a great one for Dallas sports.

Dallas hosted the Super bowl. The Mavericks won their first Championship. And I wish I could have been home from school to see my father’s face as the Rangers beat the Yankees on their way to the World Series!

But with both the NFL and NBA lockouts, what will next year be like if we do not have football or basketball to watch? BORING!

Is anyone else tired of the rich fighting the richer? Maybe they should think of their fans or the public relations nightmare they are starting to create.

One can argue that the NFL has more on the line than the NBA. I understand players do not want to play 18 games a season because of the health risks. But no matter how you look at it, if games are cancelled, fans will be disappointed. And if fans are angry, doesn’t that cost the owners and the leagues more money?

Once the MLB season is over, what will everyone do with their time? The NCAA might get a boost in the ratings.

Will we be better rested and more productive? Probably not.

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